Pipeline Challenge Goes down a Beaten (and Unsuccessful) Path

Owners in Medina, Ohio are attempting to stop Nexus surveys of the proposed properties to be taken.

The decision to acquire is one which only is made after the surveys are made and the determination of the best route is completed. One of the problems is that the determination of best route may not necessarily be what is most environmentally sensitive or least expensive, but rather what the utility, in its sole discretion, determines as the “best route”.

The challenge being made by the owners is similar to what was made and rejected in California only last week. See Alan Ackerman, Important Right of Entry Statute Found Constitutional, National Eminent Domain, July 2016.

“MEDINA, Ohio — Lawyers for a proposed natural gas pipeline argued in court that surveyors should be allowed on the land of more than 32 Medina county property owners to survey endangered bats, wetlands and cultural or historical sites along the pipeline’s 255-mile path.

Residents oppose any intrusion by Nexus Gas Transmission on their land.

Medina County Common Pleas Court Judge Christopher Collier heard part of Nexus’ request for a court order to allow the surveys Wednesday morning. The hearing will continue Thursday.

In October, Collier ruled that Nexus workers should be permitted onto the property of homeowners to perform surveys for the pipeline. That ruling has been appealed to the U.S. Ninth District Court of Appeals, which has not yet issued a ruling.

“These people have received letters saying they must sign papers to allow the (land) survey by Nexus or they (Nexus) will simply enter the property on certain dates,” said Greg Huber, lawyer for the landowners. “Private property owners have the right to tell someone they cannot enter their property. Nexus representatives come to their doors, and while one man talks, the other man stands there carrying a sidearm.”

Nexus spokesman Adam Parker responded by email, “Occasionally, Nexus employs off-duty police officers at its own expense to accompany its survey crews in order to ensure their safety and security.”

Residents in court Wednesday said that the request to allow people on their land to look for bats, wetlands and historical sites was a way of getting around homeowners’ refusal to let them survey their property for the gas line.

“I think that they are using the bat issue as a backdoor way of getting onto our land so they can survey it for the pipeline,” said Jacqueline Pradu-Fecca, of Medina.”

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